In two weeks (September 26th) Sweet Briar will conduct its annual ritual (as requested by Indiana Fletcher Williams in her will): the laying of flowers on Daisy Williams’ grave. Look carefully at this 1950s photograph and you will see Daisy’s original headstone (now in ruins behind the Sweet Briar Museum).

In two weeks (September 26th) Sweet Briar will conduct its annual ritual (as requested by Indiana Fletcher Williams in her will): the laying of flowers on Daisy Williams’ grave. Look carefully at this 1950s photograph and you will see Daisy’s original headstone (now in ruins behind the Sweet Briar Museum).

One of SBC’s many successful and famous alumnae, Elsetta Gilchrist Barnes ‘27. Within five years of graduation she had earned a prestigious degree in landscape architecture and was working at an architectural firm in Ohio. She served as the college landscape architect for decades. Here is a close-up from a blueprint she drew with planting plans for the former slave cabin. She included a sketch of the historic cabin, then in use as the Alumnae Office.

One of SBC’s many successful and famous alumnae, Elsetta Gilchrist Barnes ‘27. Within five years of graduation she had earned a prestigious degree in landscape architecture and was working at an architectural firm in Ohio. She served as the college landscape architect for decades. Here is a close-up from a blueprint she drew with planting plans for the former slave cabin. She included a sketch of the historic cabin, then in use as the Alumnae Office.

You never know what you might find on the Sweet Briar campus. So start exploring! (note: this historic photo from the early 20thC illustrates the backyard of the President’s House and some of the boxwood hedges; the building is no longer standing and I’m afraid the Peacock is not with us either).

You never know what you might find on the Sweet Briar campus. So start exploring! (note: this historic photo from the early 20thC illustrates the backyard of the President’s House and some of the boxwood hedges; the building is no longer standing and I’m afraid the Peacock is not with us either).

This spooky bas-relief medallion featuring Daisy Williams hangs in the old Daisy Williams gymnasium. Its origins are mysterious, it was re-discovered just in time for the opening of the gym in 1931. If you want to learn more about the early 20th-century SBC ghost stories, swing by the Sweet Briar Museum for tales and treats starting at 5:30pm October 30th and November 1st. For more information: http://sbc.edu/news/uncategorized/friendly-ghost-stories-sweet-briar/

This spooky bas-relief medallion featuring Daisy Williams hangs in the old Daisy Williams gymnasium. Its origins are mysterious, it was re-discovered just in time for the opening of the gym in 1931. If you want to learn more about the early 20th-century SBC ghost stories, swing by the Sweet Briar Museum for tales and treats starting at 5:30pm October 30th and November 1st. For more information: http://sbc.edu/news/uncategorized/friendly-ghost-stories-sweet-briar/

Don’t worry, it hasn’t yet snowed on campus. But the standing slave cabin (and later 20thC college classroom, tea room, and chapel) is open for visitors this fall: Monday, 3-6. Tuesday, 12-1 Wednesday, 10-11 Thursday, 3-6 Friday, 1:30-2:30. So stop by, pick up a brochure, and chat with the friendly student guides.

Don’t worry, it hasn’t yet snowed on campus. But the standing slave cabin (and later 20thC college classroom, tea room, and chapel) is open for visitors this fall: Monday, 3-6. Tuesday, 12-1 Wednesday, 10-11 Thursday, 3-6 Friday, 1:30-2:30. So stop by, pick up a brochure, and chat with the friendly student guides.

In the 1930s, the Cleveland SBC Alumnae Club started making dolls to raise money (to give to the college). The “Daisy Dolls” were actually two dolls in one: one side was “Daisy” and the other side (by flipping down the dress) was “Signora” (a.k.a., Signora Hollins, Daisy’s childhood playmate). They sold the doll for $1.75 at the slave cabin (which was then the Alumnae Cabin). Their slogan was “A Daisy Doll for every Sweet Briar grandchild.”

In the 1930s, the Cleveland SBC Alumnae Club started making dolls to raise money (to give to the college). The “Daisy Dolls” were actually two dolls in one: one side was “Daisy” and the other side (by flipping down the dress) was “Signora” (a.k.a., Signora Hollins, Daisy’s childhood playmate). They sold the doll for $1.75 at the slave cabin (which was then the Alumnae Cabin). Their slogan was “A Daisy Doll for every Sweet Briar grandchild.”

This is a horse blanket. But not any horse’s blanket. This belonged to “Bounce.” Bounce belonged to Marie Georgianna Williams, better known on campus as “Daisy.” This blanket is currently on display at the Sweet Briar Museum in their Fletcher Farm Exhibit. Check the museum website for their opening hours: http://sbc.edu/museum.

This is a horse blanket. But not any horse’s blanket. This belonged to “Bounce.” Bounce belonged to Marie Georgianna Williams, better known on campus as “Daisy.” This blanket is currently on display at the Sweet Briar Museum in their Fletcher Farm Exhibit. Check the museum website for their opening hours: http://sbc.edu/museum.

Founder’s Day ceremony around 2000. Note the replacement footstone for Daisy (in the center) and the two larger footstones (with the flowers) that mark the burials of Indiana Fletcher Williams and her husband, James Henry Williams. Elijah Fletcher’s monument can be seen in the background (the base of his obelisk). This year’s (2013) Founder’s Day ceremony will take place on September 27th.

Founder’s Day ceremony around 2000. Note the replacement footstone for Daisy (in the center) and the two larger footstones (with the flowers) that mark the burials of Indiana Fletcher Williams and her husband, James Henry Williams. Elijah Fletcher’s monument can be seen in the background (the base of his obelisk). This year’s (2013) Founder’s Day ceremony will take place on September 27th.

An early photograph of Sweet Briar House (1905). The “baby’ boxwood hedges in the front have long since blossomed into tall bushes. Otherwise, the view is very much the same (plus the addition of the lovely brick walkways provided by the Garden Club of Virginia).

An early photograph of Sweet Briar House (1905). The “baby’ boxwood hedges in the front have long since blossomed into tall bushes. Otherwise, the view is very much the same (plus the addition of the lovely brick walkways provided by the Garden Club of Virginia).